About

Better together than we are apart

HGA is a national multidisciplinary design firm rooted in architecture and engineering. We believe that enduring, impactful design results from deep insight into the people and passions that animate each unique environment. We value empathy, are fueled by curiosity, and embrace the hard work that leads to innovation. HGA’s work has received numerous awards and top rankings from our own industries, as well as those of our clients. Equally as meaningful to us is the shared legacy we create with our clients.

History

Forward thinking, even way back

Founding principals Richard Hammel, Curt Green, and Bruce Abrahamson were committed to superb modern design and a collaborative, interdisciplinary approach. From their first office in Curt Green’s basement in 1953 to a national presence today, the firm has helped shape culture, business, and society by consistently creating forward-thinking design solutions.

50s

In 1953 Hammel and Green was founded; the principals added a third partner in 1954 to become Hammel, Green and Abrahamson. Highland Park Junior High School in Saint Paul was the studio’s first major education project and is still in use today. Other education projects followed, and in 1959 the founders brought in mechanical and electrical engineers, creating a full-service firm with 20 employees.

60s

Public school experience led to commissions in higher education, arts, religion and healthcare, including the Benedicta Art Center at the College of Saint Benedict in Minnesota; St. Bede’s Priory in Wisconsin, HGA’s first national AIA Award winner; and the Minneapolis Clinic of Neurology, winner of AIA Minnesota’s 25-Year Award. A branch office was opened for a brief time in New York City.

70s

The growing firm boasted 75 employees, including civil engineers and a healthcare practice group, and moved to a new headquarters in St. Paul. Notable designs were Orchestra Hall in Minneapolis; O’Shaughnessy Auditorium at the College of St. Catherine in St. Paul; St. Joseph’s Hospital in St. Paul; and New Melleray Abbey in Iowa, our second national AIA Design Award winner.

80s

This decade saw tremendous growth with a headquarters move to Minneapolis, establishment of the structural engineering and interiors departments and opening of the Milwaukee office. Key projects were the Colonial Church of Edina, a national AIA Design Award winner; the Minnesota History Center; the Minneapolis Veterans Administration Medical Center; and the Piper Jaffray Tower.

90s

The nation’s economic boom spurred architectural expansion across industries. Our firm doubled in size to 460 employees, expanding into Rochester and Sacramento as we designed corporate campuses for Ceridian and Medtronic; innovative healthcare solutions for University of California Davis Medical Center; sustainable architecture at Northland College in Wisconsin; and arts projects at the University of Minnesota.

00s

The firm was on the move, adding offices in San Francisco and Los Angeles and moving to new buildings in Minneapolis and Milwaukee. Significant projects included a General Mills corporate campus expansion; Minnesota Public Radio headquarters; national arts projects at Illinois State University, Pier Wisconsin Discovery World and University of Alaska Museum of the North; and medical projects such as Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

10s

The addition of our Washington, D.C., and San Jose offices helps us close this decade with more than 750 employees in eight locations. Projects ranged from high-profile to top-secret as our specialized practice groups collaborated with clients including LinkedIn, Visa, FBI, U. S. Government, Macalester College, Stanford Children’s Health, Walker Art Center, and National AIA Award winner Lakewood Cemetery Garden Mausoleum in Minneapolis.

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Make a mark on the world

Here's to leading with empathy, embracing curiosity, working hard (and playing hard, too), pursuing originality, and collaborating to leave a positive lasting legacy.